About the Workshops

About the Workshops

Overview

Universal access and memorable experiences entails an overall feeling of security, comfort, freedom of choice and tailored solutions for all users, regardless of their cultural and linguistic background and/or physical, cognitive and sensory abilities. By providing user-centered accessible environments, hospitality providers – resorts, hotels, restaurants, etc. – will guarantee that all visitors/patrons enjoy their venues and services with the sensation that they have been catered for as unique clients.
In this workshop, participants will be introduced to the requirements of making a hospitality venue universally accessible through a holistic communicative approach. This entails understanding the envisioned users’ profiles, clarifying the physical, structural and communication layers in different contexts, identifying requirements and designing plans for action.

Target Participants

This Workshop is recommended for anybody (students and professionals) working or with an interest in the communication, hospitality or tourism industries. No specific previous knowledge or training is required. The maximum capacity is 20 participants.

Structure

The workshop includes a combination of (1) presentations, (2) breakout groups and (3) scenario-based problem solving with regard to (1) the parameters of universal access in hospitality, (2) the determination of site specific needs, and (3) a basic understanding of the solutions available for the development of inclusive user-centered experiences. The workshop, which will be laid out in 4 sessions, will address the following issues:

Session 1: The nature of Universal Access through the Communicative Approach

  • Defining Universal Access and User-centered Experiences
  • Defining User profiles and specific needs
  • Positioning of hospitality within the tourism cycle
  • (Multimodal) Communication within the broader picture
  • Parametrizing areas of action: Information; Wayfinding; Interaction; Experience 

Session 2: The communicative approach in detail

  • Welcomes and goodbyes (human interaction / information / wayfinding)
  • Room service (layout / information / entertainment /…)
  • Amenities (restaurant, swimming pool, spa, playground, gardens,…)
  • Emergency and specific requirements

Session 3: Auditing in practice (on site exercise)

  • Parameters for auditing/evaluating a site
  • Planning for change
  • Levels of action (from the ideal to the possible)

Session 4: The holistic picture: inclusive user-centered experiences

  • When the analogue and digital world come together towards change
  • Web presence (access within and beyond W3C)
  • Closing the cycle (from booking, to experience, to feedback)

Methodology

This workshop will be very practical in nature. Participants will be actively engaged in discussing and framing the topics in view of their needs and experience. All relevant information provided will be based on the latest international standards for Accessible tourism and hospitality. Practical examples and best practices will be shared to illustrate all the parameters addressed.
The group will be involved in group and class discussions and will be invited to carry out practical problem-solving exercises and to develop solutions for specific problems to be faced in hotels, restaurants, or other hospitality venues.
A project-based exercise will be carried out during the last two sessions. Participants will carry out an on-site auditing exercise, to then produce a plan for action, within a set of given parameters.
Finally, participants will be invited to determine personal trajectories whereby they see the implementation of the knowledge acquired.

Learning Objectives

  • To understand the nature of universal access, user-centered experience and inclusion;
  • To determine the basic parameters of access in view of specific user profiles;
  • To engage with reality in order to determine needs;
  • To determine possible strategies and tools to solve specific communication issues;
  • To define a basic plan for action for a specific setting.

Outcomes

  1. Basic knowledge in user-centered accessible environments;
  2. Ability to evaluate existing environments:
  3. Ability to devise a basic action plan for change and the implementation of a specific strategy.

Leader

Dr. Josélia Neves

Josélia Neves is Full Professor at the Translation and Interpreting Institute, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Hamad bin Khalifa University, in Qatar, where she teaches on the MA in Audiovisual Translation. She has a degree in Modern Languages and Literatures, an MA in English Studies, a PhD in Translation Studies, with a dissertation on Subtitling for the Deaf and the Hard of Hearing (SDH).

In her career as a university teacher and researcher, she has led a number of collaborative projects in various fields – television, the cinema and DVD, tourism, museums and cultural venues, the performing arts and education – in an effort to provide access to people of all abilities. She is considered a world-class expert in multimodal and multisensory communication and has published and given training all over the world on topics such as Subtitling, Audio description, Audio-tactile Transcreation, Accessible websites, Access in specific venues (schools, hospitals, museums, hotels, restaurants,…) and in Planning for Change.

In Qatar she has worked closely with Qatar Museums, Doha Film Institute, Sasol, The Supreme Committee for Delivery and Legacy, among others. She is a member of the International TransMedia Research Group and has worked on various projects with the European Network for Accessible Tourism (ENAT).

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Overview

This is a mainly practical workshop which introduces participants to the techniques of intralingual and interlingual subtitling. It will introduce the specific formal and discursive features of subtitles: the temporal and spatial constraints, timing, condensation, verbal and non-verbal cues, appropriate punctuation, positioning and segmentation.
This workshop will also encourage participants to develop professional skills informed by current regional and international industry standards and practices. Participants will be introduced to the methods of tackling culture-specific problems of audiovisual texts in subtitling, including register, dialects, as well as taboo words and interjections.
The workshop will also introduce participants to nonprofessional and professional software programs, with which they will establish their subtitling skills and undertake subtitling projects of various types of TV programs and films.

Structure

The workshop includes a combination of:

  • Presentations,
  • Practical tasks,
  • Breakout groups,
  • Application of revision parameters.

Learning Objectives

  1. Introduce participants to subtitles as a form of inter-semiotic communication and inter-linguistic mediation;
  2. Acquaint participants with the constraints and international norms of subtitling;
  3. Introduce participants to subtitling practices in the Arab World;
  4. Subtitle a variety of audio-visual materials according to current professional standards and practices;
  5. Introduce participants to the key issue of quality in subtitling, both internationally and in the Arab world.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Understand the formal and discursive features of subtitles;
  2. Understand the practical and technical constraints of subtitling;
  3. Outline the current industry practices and standards;
  4. Understand key issues of quality in subtitling;
  5. Critically reflect on the appropriate subtitling strategies to be used in each context;
  6. Effectively and professionally apply the most appropriate mediating technique when localising a media product;
  7. Use subtitling and media-editing software packages;
  8. Effectively engage with the critical issues of subtitling in both oral and written forms;
  9. Work competently and confidently with a range of media products.

Target Participants

This Workshop is recommended for translation and media students, new entrants to the profession and established practitioners. The maximum capacity is 15 participants.

Leader

Dr Amer Al-Adwan

Dr Amer Al-Adwan is an Assistant Professor of Audiovisual Translation in the Translation and Interpreting Institute, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Qatar. He obtained his PhD in Translation and Intercultural Studies from the University of Manchester, UK in 2009. He worked for few international institutions, including BBC Arabic and Aljazeera English as a translator and a subtitler. His research interests focus on audiovisual translation, discourse analysis, intercultural studies, politeness theory and media translation.

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Overview

Translation is an essential process in almost every sporting encounter around the world. During the 2022 World Cup in Qatar, for example, how will the world understand the matches played and the images displayed, viewed on their television sets, mobile devices, tracked online or commented upon in the media?
This workshop exposes participants to sports translation and writing techniques in Arabic and English and develops in them the skills required in professional sports translation and editing.

Structure

The workshop consists of:

  • Presentations,
  • Examples reflecting cases of sports translation,
  • Practice on the translation strategies adopted in sports translation,
  • A review of the translation techniques that ensure adequate sports translation outcomes.

Methodology

A set of translation exercises will be presented to the participants to enable them to evaluate their skills in the analysis and transfer of texts from source to target languages.
Participants will have the opportunity to openly exchange the challenges they encounter in their translation environments. Brainstorming questions will be raised during the workshop to ensure involving all participants.

Learning Objectives

  1. Introduce participants to the various ways that would develop in them the needed skills to sports translation and editing;
  2. Increase professional awareness among participants such as intercultural competence, and social factors in sports contexts; 
  3. Develop the skills required for participants to deal with various sports texts;
  4. Develop sports terms search skills and train participants to use proper dictionaries and glossaries.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Translate and draft short sports passages and assess them in terms of the criteria of naturalness;
  2. Apply translation skills and knowledge to solve translation issues and problems in sports texts; 
  3. Constructively revise sports translations completed by peers, based on international standards, to meet the requirements of naturalness (cohesion, coherence, genre, text type…);
  4. Search for background sports knowledge and terminology using appropriate resources, and make informed decisions about sports terms and phrases;
  5. Draft a sports translation revision report.

Target Participants

This workshop is recommended for translators, beginners and professionals. Bilingual editors, journalists and copywriters in sports fields are also encouraged to attend this workshop.

Leader

Nabeel Rashid

Nabeel is a translation reviser at HBKU’s TII. He also offers professional training to interns during their MA in translation studies. Before working at TII, Nabeel Rashid worked as an accredited court translator in Canada at the Ministry of Justice in Vancouver. He also worked as a registered health care interpreter in the Provincial Health Authority in Vancouver-Canada and provided translation services as a licensed community translator in the same city with human rights organizations such as the United Nations’ Vancouver Association for Survivors of Torture.     

Nabeel completed a postgraduate diploma in health care and community translation at British Columbia’s top career training hub, Vancouver Community College in 2012. He has two degrees in English, BA and MA from the University of Baghdad, where he worked as a lecturer at the Departments of English and translation. In 2003, he worked as a senior translator to the Secretary General of the Qatar Olympic Committee for years, and acted as a member of the Doha Asian Games Organizing Committee, in charge of the translation legacy in 2006.  

Nabeel Rashid was granted membership in translation and teaching societies such as the Society of Translators and Interpreters of British Columbia (Vancouver-Canada, 2009-2013), the American Translators Association (Virginia-USA, 2005-2009), and the Association of Canadian College and University Teachers of English (Nova Scotia-Canada, 2015-Present).

Among the translated and revised books by Nabeel Rashid in sports fields are: Vancouver Olympic Games: IOC Gathering and OG Events – 2010, Lifesaving and Water Safety by ILSF in 2008, The Moment of Lifetime: A Documentary on Sports History in Qatar- 2007, Qatar Delegation Book to Macau Asian Games-2007, Qatar in Athens Olympic Games- 2004, as well as tens of translated articles published by Qatar Athletics Federation on biomechanics, nutrition and genetic engineering in sports fields.

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Overview

This workshop aims at developing translation skills in a wide area of disciplines that includes, but is not limited to, general, legal and business translation. The training scheme will accommodate various performance skill levels of participants. Through in-sessional activities, participants will have the opportunity to get first-hand experience in translation by exposing them to the real routine work in a professional setting.

Structure

The workshop includes a combination of:

  • Presentations,
  • Individual and group work,
  • Source texts from real-life translation projects,
  • Practice on translation strategies that ensure functional adequacy in producing target texts translated to a professional standard.

Methodology

This workshop is practice-oriented with a view of applying the theoretical knowledge in Translation Studies to solving challenges and common problems translators face in their day-to-day work. A wide range of texts reflecting various genres and fields, such as education, business, media, law and technology, will be presented to the participants to translate in class or as homework.
Previously translated texts will also be used as parallel corpora to enable the participants to discuss and analyze the translation choices made and come to extrapolate the techniques and strategies conducive to adequate translation.
The participants will be engaged in translation discussion and peer review practice to develop the skills required for performing well in a professional environment. Assessment will take the form of in-class exercises and homework.

Learning Objectives

  1. Enable participants to apply the conceptual knowledge they have in real life practice;
  2. Expose participants to various professional translation assignments with texts of different modes and genres;
  3. Equip participants with translation strategies from a practitioner’s point of view;
  4. Guide participants through researching the available resources to compile glossaries and solve idiomatic expressions’ problems; 
  5. Examine the challenges posed to translators in their daily work and enable participants to take justifiable decisions when dealing with such challenges;
  6. Focus on specific aspects of Arabic as a target language in translation and help participants gain an understanding as to how Arabic differs linguistically and stylistically from English;
  7. Enable participants to criticize translated texts and defend their own choices in group discussions;
  8. Develop the translation skills required

Learning Outcomes

  1. Acquire hands-on experience in professional translation and problem solving;
  2. Acquire multiple translation strategies and techniques;
  3. Develop the necessary searching skills;
  4. Practice revision/proofreading of translations according to international standards;
  5. Experience the professional translation environment.

Leader

Sayed Mohamed

Sayed is a Senior Translation Specialist at TII’s Translation and Training Center since August 2014. He is contributing to the delivery of high-quality translation services, and working towards training Translation Studies MA students during their internship within the Center.

Sayed has more than 15 years of experience in various translation fields, including politics, literature, fine arts, law, medicine, education, media, and publishing. Before joining TII, he was a Translation Specialist at Qatar Foundation (QF) Communication Directorate. Prior to that, he had worked at Nahdet Misr Publishing Group as a translator and then a publishing executive.

Sayed’s education credentials include a Bachelor’s degree in English Language and Literature from Ain Shams University, Egypt, in 2001. He has also received a Master’s degree in Translation Studies from Hamad Bin Khalifa University in 2017. He has been trained in some of the world's most respected institutions, including a six-day knowledge transfer workshop with the Economist Group, a training program for publishers from the Arab world organized by Goethe Institute in Cairo, and a project management training course based on the PMI's methodology.

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Overview:

Professional interpreters are increasingly in demand in international organizations and agencies, law firms, and media networks. In addition to conference interpreting, community interpreting is also on the rise to ensure communication in courts, hospitals, educational institutions, government agencies, and conflict zones. In the light of the increasing demand for interpreters stirred by the process of globalization, the need to train interpreters is of paramount importance to equip them with the skills required to meet the market needs.
The purpose of this workshop is train the participants in gaining a basic knowledge in the field of interpreting. It provides an overview of the fundamentals of interpreting techniques and the different types of interpreting (simultaneous, consecutive, sight, whispering and liaison), and lays the foundation necessary to develop the advanced skills used by professional interpreters.

Structure:

The workshop includes:

  • Introduction to consecutive interpreting and note taking;
  • Strategies to develop short term memory as well as analyze and process information;
  • Introduction to simultaneous interpreting;
  • Strategies to solve linguistic and non-linguistic problems during the interpreting process;
  • Introduction to other types of interpreting (whispering, sight and liaison);
  • Short memory boosting exercises.

Methodology:

Live exercises will be provided by the trainer for simulation purposes. Specifically, participants will be trained in a set of two interpreting modes that require much preparation, i.e. consecutive and simultaneous. Boosting exercises will be used to help them develop their memory capacity and sharpness. They will also be invited to bring in their own experience as to the dilemmas they have encountered in their careers. The guided practice in this workshop will help them address questions such as:

  • Should the interpreter correct or improve the content of original audio-texts?
  • Should the interpreter grant priority to sense or style?
  • How should the interpreter prepare for the event?
  • How should the interpreter deal with neutrality?
  • Should interpreters accept work that lies beyond their competence?
  • Should interpreters undercut colleagues by offering lower prices for interpreting services?
  • What are the responsibilities towards other colleagues?
  • In what circumstances should the interpreter refuse work?

Learning Objectives:

  1. Build/develop the participants’ skills in interpreting;
  2. Conduct live interpreting exercises using a variety of audio-texts;
  3. Introduce participants to note taking;
  4. Conduct short memory boosting exercises.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Build/develop the participants’ skills in interpreting;
  2. Conduct live interpreting exercises using a variety of audio-texts;
  3. Introduce participants to note taking;
  4. Conduct short memory boosting exercises.
  5. Learn about essentials of note taking techniques;
  6. Raise awareness and exposure to the interpreting environment;
  7. Acquire fairly advanced interpreting techniques;
  8. Take part in interpreting exercises with a variety of accents;
  9. Acquire strategies to develop short term memory and information processing skills.

Target Participants

The workshop is most suited for those who have a university degree in a language-related field and/or no less than 2 years of experience in translation. A good level of proficiency in Arabic and English is required. 

Leader:

Mazen Alfarhan

Mazen Alfarhan is a graduate of the universities of Damascus, Heriot-Watt and London. He is a Translation Reviser at TII Translation & Training Center since April 2013; he revises Arabic translations, leads training workshops for the community, and supervises MA students in their internship module. 

Before joining TII, he was a lecturer of Conference Interpreting and Translation at Damascus University (1999-2013), a senior translator/interpreter for the Syrian government (2001-2010), and a freelance interpreter and translator for OIC (2009-2013).

Mazen is also a Chevening Scholar and a Karim Rida Said Scholar. His education credentials include an MA degree in International Diplomacy, an MSc degree in Arabic-English Translation & Interpreting, a postgraduate diploma in Arabicization, as well as a Certificate of Sworn Legal Translation from the Syrian Ministry of Justice.

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Overview

The canons of academia have traditionally framed the relationship between creative writing and translation within narrow theoretical boundaries.
This workshop provides training in Arabic/English Literary translation, including analyzing literary texts, identifying translation challenges between these two languages, and applying effective translation strategies to deal with them.

Structure

Four 3-hour sessions over four successive days. Each session will start with a general introduction of key issues in literary translation, using presentations and class discussion, followed by relevant practical activities.

Methodology

The workshop includes a combination of:

  • Presentations,
  • class discussion,
  • practical exercises (translation and contrastive analysis of literary translations), including small-group activities. Emphasis will laid on practical exercises.

Learning Objectives

  1. Provide participants with hands-on training in translating literary texts;
  2. Familiarize participants with the key challenges in translating literary texts;
  3. Explore the role of culture in literary translation and the strategies of dealing with it;
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of the stylistic features of literary texts.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Understand the elements of style, especially in literary works;
  2. Recognize culture-specific elements and analyze their relevance to the translation activity;
  3. Analyze a literary text and find an appropriate strategy for translating it; 
  4. Apply appropriate translation strategies to various literary texts;
  5. Gain knowledge of literary expressions and techniques;
  6. Understand the role of the translator in interpreting literary texts.

Target Participants

This Workshop is recommended for translation students, new entrants to the profession and established practitioners. The maximum capacity is 20 participants.

Leader

Dr. Tarek Shamma

Dr. Tarek is an assistant professor at the Translation and Interpreting Institute, Hamad Bin Khalifa University. He received his PhD from the State University of New York at Binghamton, USA. His research focuses on literary translation, translation history, and culture. He is the author of Translation and the Manipulation of Difference: Arabic Literature in Nineteenth-Century England, St. Jerome.

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Overview

The development of translation competence requires the mastery of translation techniques and strategies through professional training. This includes (1) mastering the mechanics underlying the craft and an endless learning process in two languages, (2) applying different approaches (depending on the text type), (3) carrying out a proper terminology search, (4) developing a sharp eye to sensitive ethical concerns, and (5) performing quality control through careful self-revision of the translation.
This workshop provides professional training in the above fields. It seeks to meet the needs of translators/would-be-translators who wish to develop their skills to perform well in a professional setting.

Structure

The workshop includes a combination of:

  • Presentations,
  • Breakout groups
  • Guided translation training and problem solving sessions with regard to (a) the principles and techniques of translation, (b) application of search tools, (c) self-revision/proofreading process and (d) professional ethics. 

Methodology

Translation strategies and techniques will be exposed and applied in (1) translating, (2) term/meaning searching, (3) proofreading/revising, and (4) training exercises through group-work sessions.

Learning Objectives

  1. Raise awareness to the importance of the translator’s toolkit;
  2. Equip participants with fairly advanced translation techniques;
  3. Guide participants through the application of the necessary search tools;
  4. Exchange experiences and discuss concerns with a view to improving translation skills in a professional setting.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Learn what to look for in a translation and how to look for it in a systematic way;
  2. Learn how to perform a terminology search;
  3. Acquire multiple translation techniques/strategies;
  4. Learn how to handle serious challenges in a text;
  5. Learn the principles of self-proofreading/revision;
  6. Increase awareness and exposure to the social responsibility of translators and/or revisers in addressing ethical problems while translating/revising a document.

Target Participants

This Workshop is recommended for established translators and students of translation. The maximum capacity is 20 participants.

Leader:

Mazen Alfarhan

Mazen Alfarhan is a graduate of the universities of Damascus, Heriot-Watt and London. He is a Translation Reviser at TII Translation & Training Center since April 2013; he revises Arabic translations, leads training workshops for the community, and supervises MA students in their internship module. 

Before joining TII, he was a lecturer of Conference Interpreting and Translation at Damascus University (1999-2013), a senior translator/interpreter for the Syrian government (2001-2010), and a freelance interpreter and translator for OIC (2009-2013).

Mazen is also a Chevening Scholar and a Karim Rida Said Scholar. His education credentials include an MA degree in International Diplomacy, an MSc degree in Arabic-English Translation & Interpreting, a postgraduate diploma in Arabicization, as well as a Certificate of Sworn Legal Translation from the Syrian Ministry of Justice.

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Overview

Quality Assurance is a systematic process of checking to see whether the translation product meets specified requirements. A quality assurance system aims at increasing customer confidence and service provider’s credibility, to improve work processes and efficiency, and to enable the provider to better compete on the translation market.
Revision is an essential part of the Quality Assurance performed as part of the translation production process. This has been recognized by the European Quality Assurance Standard EN 15038 and International Quality Assurance Standard ASTM/F 2575, which require that Translation Service Providers should ensure that translations be revised. Often revisers and translators receive little or no training in revision techniques. Specialized training in quality assurance would improve the quality of the revision process and increase the quality of the final translation product.
The above-mentioned international standards have foregrounded revision as a key step in ensuring translation quality and defines it as the process of examining a translation for its “suitability for purpose and respect for the domain to which it belongs” and “recommending corrective action as necessary”.

Structure

The workshop includes a combination of:

  • Presentations,
  • Breakout groups
  • Scenario-based problem solving with regard to (a) the principles of revision, (b) revision process (c) application of revision parameters, and (d) revision ethics.

Methodology

The European Quality Assurance Standard EN 15038 and International Quality Assurance Standard ASTM/F 2575 will be exposed and applied in (1) self-revision, (2) comparative (bilingual) revision, and (3) unilingual (monolingual) revision exercises through group-work sessions.

Learning Objectives

  1. Raise awareness to the importance of revision/quality assurance in translation;
  2. Conduct practical monolingual and bilingual revision exercises to develop the skills required for participants to deal with  various issues while revising their own work and the translation of their colleagues;
  3. Exchange experiences and discuss concerns with a view to improving revision in both theory and practice.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Learn what to look for in a translation and how to do so in a systematic way;
  2. Acquire a vocabulary (metalanguage) for discussing revision issues;
  3. Learn how to give structured feedback to translators;
  4. Distinguish between a translation that meets the required standard of quality and one that requires revision;
  5. Identify in a translation, whether produced  by machine or by a translator, the nature of the elements to edit in line with the criteria of international standards; 
  6. Understand the dilemmas faced by the reviser and develop the confidence to resolve them;
  7. Increase awareness and exposure to the social responsibility of revisers in addressing ethical revision problems;
  8. Expose and analyze the revision challenges participants have encountered in their careers, for them to upgrade their skills to address them.

Target Participants

This Workshop is recommended for translation students, new entrants to the profession and established practitioners. The maximum capacity is 20 participants.

Leader

Dr. Ahmed Alaoui

Dr. Ahmed is the Head of Translation and Training Center at TII. He is a graduate of the University of Wales, and University of Essex, England. His research work focuses on translation pedagogy (translator-training). His latest book, Translation: a Practical Guide for English-Arabic Translators, is the fruit of more than 20 years of teaching translation at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels. He has written many articles on translation pedagogy. He was also a Visiting Scholar at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA, and University of Nantes, France.

Dr. Alaoui is also a confirmed professional translator, certified by the United Nations (Roster) and the Ministry of Justice of the Kingdom of Morocco. He has been providing translation and revision services to national and international organizations. As a professional trainer, he has been leading Translation workshops for 26 years.

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Overview

Translation technologies are tools to aid in translating texts; they are not replacements for human translators. They are helpful devices that can change the way we work, taking over tasks that are tedious and repetitive, and leaving to us what we do best, namely using our mental process to make wise decisions.
The workshop explains how SDL Trados Studio proves to be very valuable, especially as far as the language elements in the project are concerned. Such a value can be optimized depending on the expertise of translators and project managers in dealing with the advanced features of the application. Knowing how to efficiently handle these features turns them into an asset for professional translators, project managers and language service providers.
This workshop is designed for professional translators and translation studies students who already have basic knowledge of translation technologies like SDL Trados Studio and wish to develop advanced understanding of SDL Trados and Project Management with emphasis on advanced features of the application, so that they can enhance their productivity and quality.

Structure

The scope of this workshop is to familiarize participants with the advanced features of SDL Trados Studio and project management. It contains practical, real-life examples of how to leverage SDL Trados Studio to streamline translation processes. The workshop provides the following:

  • General information on translation projects management;
  • Overview of SDL Trados Studio project management cycle;
  • Examples of how to manage projects using the most commonly exploited features in SDL Trados Studio;
  • Review and sign off project in SDL Trados Studio.

Methodology

The main focus of this training workshop is on real-life examples, for which training sample files will be used. Some presentations will be used to explain the theoretical ideas behind the practical examples used during the training.

Learning Objectives

  1. Set up users and customers in the system;
  2. Introduce participants to the process of translating and editing in SDL Trados Studio;
  3. Use the project wizard to create new projects;
  4. Read reports generated by the system, e.g. File Analyze Report;
  5. Package files and assign tasks to translators and revisers;
  6. Import return packages with translated files into your project;
  7. Change project settings;
  8. Work with revisers who are not equipped with SDL Trados Studio;
  9. Run automated quality assurance on project files.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Deal with project templates;
  2. Process multiple files by creating projects;
  3. Run tasks such as file analysis and pre-translation;
  4. Read project reports and statistics;
  5. Display only particular segments in a document, e.g. all unconfirmed segments, all segments that contain a particular term, etc.;
  6. Merge multiple files into one master file;
  7. Use automated quality assurance features for checking translations, e.g. for extra blank spaces, terminology errors, etc.;
  8. Fine-tune auto-propagation settings;
  9. Revise files with track changes inside and outside Trados environment;
  10. Finalize projects and update main translation memories.

Target Participants

This Workshop is recommended for translation students, new entrants to the profession and established practitioners. The maximum capacity is 10 participants.

Leader

Wahba Youssef

Wahba has been working for TII Translation and Training Center as a Senior Translation Specialist since October 2015. He is in charge of translation technologies at TTC and trains MA students on using CAT tools and project management techniques.

Wahba is a graduate of Ain Shams University Egypt, 2001. His major study was English, Arabic and German. He holds a diploma in Information Systems Analysis and Design regulated by NCC in cooperation with the Egyptian Ministry of Communications in 2003. He also obtained a BA degree in International Business and Management from Bournemouth University. Additionally, he gained a level 2 diploma in Financial Accounting under the regulation of the Association of Accounting Technicians in London and was awarded the membership of the association. He is also certified in SDL Trados Studio 2017, SDL MultiTerm 2017 Desktop and MemoQ Level PM.

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Overview

Translation technologies are tools to aid in translating texts; they are not replacements for human translators. They are helpful devices that can change the way we work, taking over tasks that are tedious and repetitive, and leaving to us what we do best, namely using our mental process to make wise decisions.
The workshop explains how CAT tools prove to be very valuable, especially as far as the language elements in the project are concerned. Such a value can be optimized depending on the expertise of translators and project managers in dealing with CAT tools. Knowing how to efficiently handle these tools turns them into an asset for professional translators and language service providers.
This workshop is designed for professional translators and translation studies students who wish to quickly explore CAT tools with emphasis on SDL Trados Studio, so that they can start working productively with this leading translation system from day one.

Structure

The scope of this workshop is to familiarize participants with the main features of SDL Trados Studio. It contains practical, real-life examples of how to leverage SDL Trados Studio to streamline translation processes. This workshop provides the following:

  • General information on CAT technologies;
  • Overview of the SDL Trados Studio;
  • Examples of how to translate documents using the most commonly exploited features in SDL Trados Studio;

Methodology

The main focus of this training workshop is on real-life examples, for which training sample files will be used. Some presentations will be used to explain the theoretical ideas behind the practical examples used during the training.

Learning Objectives

  1. CAT technologies overview;
  2. SDL Trados Studio Environment;
  3. Configure the application to your personal preferences;
  4. Deliver the finished translation;
  5. Exchange experiences and discuss concerns with a view to improving the usage of translation technologies in both theory and practice.

Learning outcomes

  1. Understand CAT technologies: what is a translation memory (TM), termbase, AutoSuggest dictionary?
  2. Create and maintain Translation Memories
  3. Translate MS Office files in SDL Trados Studio making use of the most common features;
  4. Translate PDF files;
  5. Segment Fragment Matching;
  6. User Defined Settings;
  7. Aligne Legacy Files;
  8. Generate Auto-Suggest Dictionaries;
  9. Create Termbases from Excel glossaries;
  10. Perform Fuzzy Match Repairs;
  11. Generate target translations and update translation memories.

Target Participants

This Workshop is recommended for translation students, new entrants to the profession and established practitioners. The maximum capacity is 10 participants.

Leader

Wahba Youssef

Wahba has been working for TII Translation and Training Center as a Senior Translation Specialist since October 2015. He is in charge of translation technologies at TTC and trains MA students on using CAT tools and project management techniques.

Wahba is a graduate of Ain Shams University Egypt, 2001. His major study was English, Arabic and German. He holds a diploma in Information Systems Analysis and Design regulated by NCC in cooperation with the Egyptian Ministry of Communications in 2003. He also obtained a BA degree in International Business and Management from Bournemouth University. Additionally, he gained a level 2 diploma in Financial Accounting under the regulation of the Association of Accounting Technicians in London and was awarded the membership of the association. He is also certified in SDL Trados Studio 2017, SDL MultiTerm 2017 Desktop and MemoQ Level PM.

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Overview

Law is a part of culture; hence legal translation is “documentary translation” (secondary text to help understanding). Though the translation does not replace the original text with its legal status, it should be transparent enough to produce the same legal effects in practice. The legal translator’s work is based on Hermeneutics, since one needs to understand the text without necessarily being a jurist. The source text offers the input on the basis of which a new autonomous text is created in the target language taking into account mainly the needs of the final users. Written legal documents are characterized by a specific style and rhetorical structure to prevent fraud, additions, omissions or alterations in legal text. These characteristics differ across languages.
The purpose of this workshop is to expose the various features of legal texts and the challenges they pose to professional translators. A good deal of contact time will be devoted to practicing the strategies that help overcome such challenges, with reference to Arabic and English legal documents, for participants to upgrade their translation competence in the field of legal translation.

Structure

The workshop includes a combination of:

  • Presentations,
  • Breakout groups
  • Scenario-based problem solving with regard to (a) basic strategies of legal translation, (b) practice on translating contracts (c) practice on translating Criminal Law documents, (d) practice on translating Family Law documents, and (e) practice on revision and solving ethical issues in legal translation. 

Methodology

Group work: All in-class practical exercises are conducted in groups, where participants  benefit from guided practice to:

  • Focus on translation as a process, questioning the proposed solution and finding arguments to adopt or reject it, in line with the function of the translation assignment;
  • Find the best solution rather than the final cut-and-dried solution, keeping the same thematic structure of the source text;
  • Focus on translating as text-production (textuality test).

Learning Objectives

  1. Raise awareness to the major problems encountered in legal translation;
  2. Build capacity to develop the translation strategies professional translators use to solve such problems;
  3. Build capacity of legal text revision and proofreading;
  4. Build capacity to address ethical issues in legal translation.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Participants develop the required level of awareness and skills to make informed decisions in translating legal texts;
  2. Participants develop the skill of analyzing legal texts for translation purposes;
  3. Participants develop the skill of repairing aspects of loss and the techniques of revising legal texts;
  4. Participants develop the skill of argumentation to defend their choices as to the ethical issues related to the translation of legal texts.

Target Participants

This Workshop is recommended for translation students, new entrants to the profession and established practitioners, as well as jurists and law professionals. The maximum capacity is 20 participants.

Leader

Dr. Ahmed Alaoui

Dr. Ahmed Alaoui is the Head of Translation and Training Center at TII. He is a graduate of the University of Wales, and University of Essex, England. His research work focuses on translation pedagogy (translator-training). His latest book, Translation: a Practical Guide for English-Arabic Translators, is the fruit of more than 20 years of teaching translation at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels. He has written many articles on translation pedagogy. He was also a Visiting Scholar at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA, and University of Nantes, France.

Dr. Alaoui is also a confirmed professional translator, certified by the United Nations (Roster) and the Ministry of Justice of the Kingdom of Morocco. He has been providing translation and revision services to national and international organizations. As a professional trainer, he has been leading Translation workshops for 26 years.

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